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Induction vs Conventional Cooking - Sears

Kitchen Showdown: Conventional vs Induction Cooking


There are now more options than ever to whip up tasty treats and family meals. Conventional cooking utilizes a gas flame to heat a pan or radiant electricity to make your dish. Induction, on the other hand, uses electromagnetic energy to heat only the pan without warming the air or surface. Both will have your family going back for seconds in no time, so let's take a look and see how they stack up.

Conventional Cooking

Induction Cooking

Cookware

No specific requirementCan only be used with iron or steel cookware

Cooking

Gas flame or radiant electric heatElectro-magnetic heat

Heating

Heats cookware at point of contact Heats cookware evenly and food cooks much faster

Safety

Utilize flame/radiant element that are hot to touch and air around themOnly heat the vessel and not the cooktop itself

Conventional Cooking

Advantages of Conventional Cooking

  • Easier control over the cooking process – When using a gas stove, you don’t have to worry much about the size or position of the cookware.
  •  No specific cookware to be used – There are no limitations on what kind of cookware you can use with a conventional gas cooktop.

Disadvantages of Conventional Cooking

  • Open flame – Gas cooktops are always risky as they require the use of an open flame.
  • Longer cook times – Having to heat up, especially when it comes to electric cooktops, lengthens the time it takes to cook your meal. 
conventional cooking

Induction Cooking

induction cooking

Advantages of Induction Cooking

  • A safe option – An induction surface remains cool and only heats up when it comes into contact with your cookware.
  • Efficient in terms of energy use – These cooktops heat up much faster and cooking takes far less time than a more conventional process.
  • Precise temperature control – Enjoy the advantage of tight controls as well as the capacity for very low temperature settings.

Disadvantages of Induction Cooking

  • Limitations on cookware used – These cooktop surfaces can only be used with flat surface, iron and steel cookware.
  • Power supply – Unlike a gas range that can perform even in a power outage, induction cooking depends on electricity.