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How to Cure Your Lawn's Bald Spots

How to Cure Your Lawn's Bald Spots
 

Whether you have a green thumb or are a landscaping novice, everyone wants a luscious lawn that's the envy of the neighborhood. Even on the greenest pastures, a bald spot can rear its ugly head in your yard. Don't fret. Once you identify the cause of the damage, you can fix it in no time. Here are some common causes of bald spots and tips for curing them in no time.


Weeds & Dandelions

Weeds

Whether it's crabgrass, clover, dandelions or other pesky weeds, they can steal valuable nutrients from your lawn. Fortunately, combating these is easy for any homeowner.
 

The Fix…

  • Use a weed prevention mix - At the start of each spring, you'll want to put down a layer of weed prevention mix. This won't completely eliminate the weeds, but it will diminish the germination of the previous year's seeds.
  • Mow frequently - Maintaining a regular mowing schedule helps keep flower heads from creating more seeds that will add to your troubles.
  • Fertilize - A lawn that's flourishing will combat weeds trying to encroach the surface. Fertilize regularly to keep your grass growing strong. This will keep weak weed seedlings from the nutrients they need to grow.

Bugs

You spent some time cultivating a lush, green lawn, but now it's become the main course for some hungry insects. Here are some ways to help you knock out a bug infestation and get your grass growing strong once again.

 

The Fix…

  • Identify the type of bug - Once you've spotted an area where the grass appears visibly damaged or is growing irregularly, you can go to work. When the pests aren't immediately seen, mix together a water and dish detergent solution and spread that over the area. This will bring insects to the surface. Some bugs will require you to remove the top layer of turf in order to detect them.
  • Remove & reseed - Remove the damaged grass and rake the spot until it's even. Once the area is properly irrigated, reseed and apply fertilizer to it. Some bugs prefer a specific type of grass, so you may need to change up the seed to have them heading for the hills.
  • Choose pesticide alternatives - Since broad pesticides can attack both the bugs and grass, you might want to try a different approach. Consider different animal deterrents to drive them away. For many pests there are predators that can be introduced that will root them out. It's also helpful to put a bird feeder or two in your lawn to attract birds that will take care of the bugs snacking on your lawn.

Mowing Damage

Mowing Damage

Sometimes your trusty lawn mower can do more harm than good. Let's take a look at how to keep your mower at the right level to avoid hurting your grass.
 

The Fix…

  • Sharpen the blades - A dull blade will tear at the blades instead of slicing through them. At the start of each season and periodically throughout the spring and summer, you'll want to have the blades sharpened. In some cases, it might be better to replace the mower blades altogether.
  • Raise the cutting deck - Removing too much of the blade will keep it from growing properly. Make sure to set your mower to only remove the top third of the blade.

Pet Waste

If Fido "does his business" in the same spot every morning, it can be problematic. The waste has a high concentration of nitrogen that can deteriorate grass over time. No worries. The solution is simple.
 

The Fix...

  • Remove & flush - Pick up solid waste to keep it from sinking into the soil. Urine spots should be rinsed with water regularly to reduce the nitrogen concentration.
  • Reseed - If damage has occurred, remove the dead grass and rake the soil until it is smooth and even. Heavily reseed the area, and water the area twice a day until the seeds germinate. Some products might require more or less frequent watering, so check the item's directions.
  • Take precaution - Rotate the places where your dog does its business to avoid damaging the same spots repeatedly.